1886 Tenney and Howell: History of Knox

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BI-CENTENNIAL HISTORY OF ALBANY

HISTORY
OF THE
COUNTY OF ALBANY
N. Y.
,

From 1609 TO 1886.

WITH PORTRAITS, BIOGRAPHIES and ILLUSTRATIONS

HOWELL * TENNEY

ASSISTED BY
LOCAL WRITERS

NEW YORK:
W. W. MUNSELL & CO., PUBLISHERS,

1886

KNOX was named from John Knox, the eminent divine and bold reformer of Scotland. It was formed from Berne, February 28, 1822. It has the smallest area of any town in the county, containing 26,402 acres. It is situated in the northwest corner of the county, and is bounded, north by Schenectady County, east by Guilderland, south by Berne, and west by Schoharie County.

Its surface is an elevated plateau, inclining slightly toward the northwest from the Helderbergs, which lie on its eastern border. Small hills diversify the surface. The soil is generally of good quality, and arable, "composed of a gravelly, calcareous loam mixed with clay, overtopping hardpan. Several small caves are found in this town. It is a farming town, with a few grist, saw and woolen mills for local manufacture.

The first settlers were Dutch, who took leases from Van Rensselaer before the Revolution. After this war, from 1788 to 1790, several families from Connecticut came to settle. Among them were Samuel Abbott and Andrew Brown. Tories were there during the Revolution until the surrender of Burgoyne, when they went to a more congenial home in the Canadas. Capt. Jacob Van Aerden was the leading man among the Whigs of that day.

The first church is said to have been the Dutch Reformed. There long existed a public library in this town. In 1824 it numbered about 400 volumes. It was modeled after the New England town libraries, and was helpful in forming the character of the people to habits of intellectual culture and good morals.

The anti-rent feeling in this town was general and intense. Most of the farmers held manorial leases, and resisted the collection of rents with inflexible determination. Collectors, sheriffs, and the posse comilalus were often unsuccessful. Resort was had more than once to the military, who, without bloodshed, caused arrests and trials in courts.

Strifes of this sort began soon after the death of "the old Patroon," in 1839, who had been very indulgent to his tenants. It pervaded all the towns of the county, and all the people who occupied leased lands. It entered into local and State politics. No towns, perhaps, showed more active resistance than Berne and Knox. It lasted several years, and was terminated only by the decisions of the courts and the enforcement of law. Even as late as July, 1866, a detachment of 100 men under Capt. James McFarland, of the 10th regiment, went from Albany to Knox and secured the arrest of nine respectable citizens, who, no doubt, honestly felt that they were resisting unjust claims.

Page 869

HISTORY OF THE TOWNSHIP OF KNOX.

DESCRIPTIVE.

KNOX is the northwestern town in Albany County. It is bounded on the north by Schoharie County, on the east by Guilderland and New Scotland, on the south by Berne, and on the west by Schoharie County. It has an area of over 25,000 acres, and .measures about six miles across, north and south and east and west. It is centrally distant about twenty miles from Albany.

The surface of the town consists of a high,' undulating plateau region, marked by a few small hills. Its eastern part constitutes a portion of the Helderberg region, but the declivities are gradual, and give the surface a moderate inclination toward the northwest. The soil is chiefly gravel and clay, with hard pan underneath. Large boulders are numerous, and the geological outcroppings in various parts of the town present a very interesting study.

Knox, now almost stripped of its timber, was originally covered by a luxuriant growth of pine, birch, maple, oak, ash, basswood, hemlock and other varieties of wood common to the region of which it forms a part.

The principal streams of Knox are the Bozenkill, forming a part of its eastern boundary, and its branches, and Beaver Dam Creek, in the southern part.

About a mile and a quarter north of Knoxville are two caves, supposed to be of considerable extent, which are objects of much interest to many, and about which cluster several picturesque, but scarcely probable, legends, which have been handed down to the present generation of residents, through their ancestors, from the early settlers. Another thing that is often remarked by people who have driven over the road from Knowersville to Knoxville, is the long stretch of road, some distance from the latter place on the high plateau extending through that part of the town, presenting the appearance of having been paved by nature at a prehistoric time and left for the use of man. The rocks over which this road has its way are flat and quite smooth, and a small amount of cutting here and there would render it one of the evenest. Indeed, it is much preferable, in its natural state, to the average cobble-stone pavements of our cities.

The Albany and Susquehanna Railroad traverses the northeastern corner of the town, with a waystation known as Knox. There are within the boundaries of the town about eighty-five miles of public roads, most of which are kept in excellent condition the year round, a circumstance which, more than any other one thing, evidences the thrift of its citizens.

Thompson's Lake is a small body of water in the southeast part of Knox which extends into the adjoining town of Berne.


EARLY SETTLEMENT AND PROMINENT CITIZENS

.

The first settlers upon the territory now designated as Knox were Germans, who located there some time before the Revolutionary war. Some of them espoused the English cause, and after the defeat of Burgoyne found temporary refuge in Canada. Captain Jacob Van Aernden was an active leader of the Whigs of this section during the struggle for independence.

In 1789 Samuel Abbott and Andrew Brown, from Connecticut, settled in this locality, and not long afterward twenty or thirty other families came from the same State. From this period on, the most prominent families in the town were the Browns, Todds, Williamses, Denisons, Crarys, Chesebroughs, Gallups, Frinks, Tabers, Coatescs, Gages, Weitzels, Pinckneys, Williamsons, Basslers, Saddlemires, Haverleys, Timmers, Engles, Schoonmakers, Swarts, Sands, Clickmans, Keenholtses and Batchers.

Some of these names are now extinct in the town; but many of them have had representatives in successive generations to the present time. Among the prominent citizens of the town during the period from its organization to 1850 were Malachi Whipple, Dr. Erastus Williams, Egbert Schoonmaker, Frederick Bassler, Potter Gage, Alexander Crounse, Charles Chesebro, David Van Aukin, Perez Frink, Henry Denison, P. Witter, Isaac Barber, Daniel Chesebro, John Gallup, Wright Skinner, Dow Van Derker, Henry Williams, Cyrus Chapman, Henry Dane, Daniel Gallup, Joseph Gallup, Samuel Russel, Gurden Gallup, the Seaburys and Charles Clute, some of whom are still living, and still active in all public affairs. The following named men were the best known and most influential residents of the town about 1850, and for a much later period, and some of them rank among the leading men of Knox at this time: Henry Barckley, Elisha White, John C. Cannady, Joel and Gilbert Gage, Jacob Auchampaugh, Bemsby Williamson, John Finch, John Allen, Jr., Peter Schoonmaker, Alexander Crounse, John G. Crary, Charles G. Frink, Denison Crary, Alexander Crounse, Jacob P. Hane, John Posson, Conrad Batcher, Gurden Gallup, Anson Tols, John H. Hand, Samuel O. Schoonmaker, Lyman Witter, Frederick Orelup, John H. Sand, Israel Walker, Sylvester Allen, Elias K. Williams, Jacob Kip, Jacob Bronk, Edward Settle, Abram H. Onderdonk, Azer Gallup, Joseph A. Haswell, Henry F. Orelup, Adam Snyder, Cornelius Woolford,

David Van Auken, James Armstrong, Henry Tarpanny, John T. Beebe, Frederick Leh, Isaac N. Crary, John G. Gallup, George W. Stephens, William Williamson, Eldridge Chesebro, Amos Crary, Ebenezer Gallup, Stephen Hungerford, Robert Hurst, S. Flansburgh, Thomas Stafford, John V. Schoonmaker, Henry W. Williams, Orange Beeman, John Bassler, Frederick Clyckman, Matthias Brackley, Jehial White, Conrad Batcher, John F. Sternburgh, John Posson, Jacob Crounse, Evert M. Brackley, Hiram Thousand, James Finch, Peter Swan, 2d, Archibald Scott, David W. Sturges, Rodney Wilder, Philip Giflbrd, Benjamin Lee, Henry Duteher, Jacob Truax and William Davenport.

The civil list, elsewhere presented, and the notices of the various institutions and interests of the town, contain the names of those who have been foremost among the citizens of Knox since the date mentioned.

In the troublous times of the Revolution and of the anti-rent struggles, which are referred to at length in the general history of Albany County, some of the pioneers of Knox and their descendants bore a part.


CIVIL HISTORY.

The town of Knox was erected by an act entitled " An Act to Divide the Town of Bern, in the County of Albany," passed February 28, 1822. Its text is as follows:

" I— Be it enacted by the People of the State of New York, represented in Senate and Assembly, That, from and after the first day of March next, all that part of the town of Bern, in the county of Albany, lying south of a line commencing on the west line of the said town of Bern, three chains south of the public road laid from the manor line to Schoharie Court House, and running north eighty-five degrees east, until it intersects the west line of the town of Bethlehem, thirty-eight chains on a course south, five degrees east from the corner of Bethlehem and Guilderland, be and remain a separate town, by the name of Bern ; and all the remaining part of Bern lying north of the aforesaid line be erected into a new town by the name of Knox ; and that the next town meeting in the town of Bern shall be holden at the place where it .now stands adjourned, and the next town meeting in the town of Knox be holden on the first Tuesday of March next, at the Presbyterian Meeting House, near Sarah Todd's dwelling house, in said town.

" II.—-And be it further enacted, That, as soon as may be after the first Tuesday in April next, the supervisors and overseers of the poor in the towns of Bern and Knox aforesaid shall, by notice given for that by the supervisors thereof, meet together and apportion the poor maintained by the said towns of Bern and Knox, and the poor money belonging to the same, agreeable to the last tax list; and that each of the said towns shall forever thereafter separately support their own poor."

Much historic material, of great local interest and importance, passed away with the destruction by fire of the records of Knox, covering the period from its organization to the year 1850. At the expense of considerable time and trouble, the following list of the supervisors of the town, during the period mentioned, has been obtained:

1822-24, Malachi Whipple; 1825, Erastus Williams; 1826-31, Egbert Schoonmaker; 183237, Frederick Bassler, Jr.; 1838-39, Egbert Schoonmaker; 1840-42, Potter Gage; 1842-43, Alexander Crounse; 1844-45, Charles Cheesbro; 1846-47, David Van Auken; 1848-49, Perez Frink, Jr.

As is usually the case in agricultural towns, the office of the town clerk of Knox has been at the residence of each successive incumbent. The same misfortune rendered the town clerk homeless and deprived the town of the records of its municipal transactions. From the record made after that event it appears that, at the annual town meeting of 1850, Michael Lee, Daniel Gallup, Abraham Batcher and Stephen Merselis, Jr., were present in their capacity as justices of the peace, and Ephraim N. Bogardus acted as clerk. The meeting was held on the 9th day of April, at the house of Henry Barckley, and the following officers were duly elected:

Lyman Witter, Supervisor; John G. Crary, Town Clerk ; Samuel O. Schoonmaker, Justice of the Peace; John H. Hand, Superintendent of Schools; Anson Tols, Collector; Gurdon Gallup and Conrad Batcher, Overseers of the Poor; John Posson, Assessor; Jacob P. Hane, Commissioner of Highways; Peter Schoonmaker, Alexander Crounse and John Allen, Jr., Inspectors of Election, District No. I ; John Finch, Bemsby Williamson and Jacob Auchempaugh, Inspectors of Election, District No. 2; Gilbert Gage, Joel Gage, John C. Cannady and Elisha White, Constables.

At this meeting Henry Barckley's house was designated as "The Town House," or place of holding township meetings, for the ensuing year. The town was divided into fifty-six road districts, and the following named persons were chosen overseers of highways:

John Posson, Jacob Crounse, Hiram Thousand, Evert M. Barckley, David W. Sturges, Archibald Scott, Peter Swan, 2d, James Finch, Rodney W1lder, Philip Gifford, Jacob Truax, Henry

Dutcher, William Davenport, Benjamin Lee, Matthias Barckley, Jehiel White, John F. Sternburgh, Conrad Batcher, John Bassler, Frederick Clyckman, John Oliver, Orange Beeman, Henry W. Williams, Thomas Stafford, John V. Schoonmaker, Robert Hurst, S. Flansburgh, Stephen Hungerford, Ebenezer Gallup, Alexander Crounse, Amos Crary, William Williamson, Eldridge Cheesbro, George W. Stephens, John G. Gallup, Isaac N. Crary, Frederick Leh, John T. Beebe, James Armstrong, Henry Tarpenny, David Van Auken, Cornelius Woolford, Adam Snyder, Henry F. Orelup, Joseph A. Haswell, Azor Gallup, Abraham H. Onderdonk, Edward Settle, Jacob Bronk, Jacob Kipp, Elias R. Williams, Silvester Allen, Israel Walker, John H. Sand and Frederick Orelup.

The following entries appear in the town records for the year 1851:

" In conformity with the statute, the following by-laws are considered necessary by the majority of the electors present:

"Article 1st.—It is ordained by the electors present of the town of Knox, at their annual town meeting, convened and held at the house of Henry Barckley, in and for the town of Knox, and county of Albany, on the 8th day of April, 1851, that the following rules and regulations be adopted as bylaws and ordinances for the said town of Knox.

"Article 2d.—And it is further ordered that the town of Knox shall be divided into three assessment districts, and that each district shall be entitled to one assessor. And that all that part of the town of Knox lying north of the center of the township road, running east and west through the said town, compose the North District. And all that part of said town of Knox lying east of the center of the road leading from the place formerly owned by Evert Barckley to the place formerly owned by Cyrus Chapman and south of the township road, compose one district, and the same shall be known as the Eastern District. And all the remaining part of the said town of Knox lying west of the Eastern District and south of the North District shall compose- one district, and the same shall be known as the Southern District.

" Article jd.—And be it enacted that the overseers of the poor shall at every annual town meeting hereafter report to the town meeting the number of poor to be maintained, and the cost of their maintenance, the receipts and expenditures of all moneys in their hands, and what sum in their opinion will be necessary to maintain the poor for the ensuing year, that the same may be raised and collected.

"Article 4th.—And it is further ordained that all partition fences for lands, gardens, orchards or meadows shall be five feet high and otherwise good and sufficient.

" Article 5th.-—And it is ordained that the fence viewers shall be allowed seventy-five cents for each day's service in the execution of their office.

" Article 6th.—And it is further ordained that no horses shall go at large; also, that no cattle, sheep or swine shall go at large, and that the penalty on them shall be, when found going at large and secured in any pen or yard or any premises, the owner or owners thereof shall pay to the person or persons so taking them up the following sums: For every stallion two years old or older, four dollars; for every cow, ox, steer, bull or calf, fifty cents; for every sheep, two cents per head, for every swine, six cents per head, and for every boar two months old or older, two dollars.

"Article 7th.—All moneys collected for the violation of the by-laws shall go, the one-half to the person or persons taking up the said catile, horses, sheep or swine, the other half to the poor of the town aforesaid.

" Article 8th.—And it is further ordained that every person's yard shall be his own pound, and that he shall give the owner notice within twentyfour hours of all trespasses, and that stock shall be impounded no longer than forty-eight hours."

These ordinances were subsequently modified or amplified as occasion required. They are given as being of interest as the first by-laws of Knox, the records of which are extant.

The civil list of the town of Knox from 1851 to 1854, inclusive, is given below, except for the years 1868-72, inclusive, missing from the records:

1851.—Lyman Witter, Supervisor; John G. Crary, Town Clerk; Amos Crary, Justice of the Peace; Jacob Truax, Collector; Charles Saddlemire and Conrad Batcher, Overseers of the Poor; John Posson and John T. Beebe, Assessors; George Freighley, Commissioner of Highways; Johan Jost Sand, James M. Cheesbro and Philip Chrysler, Inspectors of Election, District No. 1; Potter Gage, Jacob Auchenpo and William Williamson, Inspectors of Election, District No. 2; Charles Gage, Joel Gage, Johan Jost P. Deitz and John Quay, Constables.

1852.—Stephen Mercelis, Jr., Supervisor; John R..Williams, Justice of the Peace; John H. Sand, Superintendent of Schools; Denison Crary, Town Clerk;. John Jost P. Deitz, Collector; Joseph A. Haswell, Assessor; John Bassler, Commissioner of Highways; Charles Saddlemire and Conrad Batcher, Overseers of the Poor; James M. Cheesbro, John Allen, Jr., and Ezra Champion, Jr., Inspectors of Election, District No. 1; William Gage, Thomas P. Whipple and James Finch, Inspectors of Election, District No. 2; Charles Gage, John Quay, William Snyder and Andrew Batcher, Constables.

1853.—Stephen Merselis,Jr.,Supervisor; Michael Lee, Justice of the Peace; Denison Crary, Town Clerk; Frederick Bassler, Assessor; Lewis Quay, Collector; Alexander Crounse, Commissioner of Highways; David Van Auken, Overseer of the Poor; James M. Cheesbro, John Allen, Jr., and Ezra Champion, Jr., Inspectors of Election, District No. 1; Peter Swan, Oliver B. Wood and John A. Landrum, Inspectors of Election, District No.

2; Charles Gage, John Quay, Andrew Batcher and Henry Fullington, Constables.

1854.—Henry Barckley, Supervisor; John P. Canady, Justice of the Peace; Hiram Crounse, Superintendent of Schools; Denison Crary, Town Clerk; Matthias F. Warner, Assessor; Lewis Quay, Collector; Ira Van Auken, Abram Batcher and Potter Gage, Commissioners of Highways; Edward A, Chase and David Swart, Overseers of the Poor; James M. Cheesbro, John Allen, Jr., and Elias K. Williams, Inspectors of Election, District No. 1; Potter Gage, Manasseh Schoonmaker and James Finch, Inspectors of Election, District No. 2; Charles Gage, Henry Fullington, David Ecker, George Richter, Clark Stephens and Sylvester Allen, Constables.

1855.—Henry Barckley, Supervisor; Ephraim A. Bogardus, Justice of the Peace; Charles Gallup, Town Clerk; David Finch, Collector; Charles I. Frink, Commissioner of Highways; David Swart and William Williamson, Overseers of the Poor; Andrew J. Onderdonk and De Witt Schoonmaker, Inspectors of Election, District No. 1; John Lake and Lewis Barlow, Inspectors of Election, District No. 2; Jacob Auchempaugh, Assessor; Charles Gage, George Pitcher, Alfred A. Whipple, John D. Haverly and Cornelius Hellicass, Constables.

1856.—John Keenholtz, Supervisor; Samuel Werner and Daniel C. Seabury, Justices of the Peace; Charles Gallup, Town Clerk; Hiram Crounse, Superintendent of Schools; David Finch, Collector; Peter Schoonmaker and Jacob J. Truax, Assessors; William Lear, Commissioner of Highways; William W. Williams and Charles Saddlemire, Overseers of the Poor; Philip D. Haverly, David Swart and John Allen, Jr., Inspectors of Election, District No. 1; Robert Schoonmaker, Alanson Lake and James Finch, Inspectors of Election, District No. 2; Charles Gage, Lewis Vroman. Ira Bunza, George Pitcher and John D. Haverly, Constables.

1857.—John Keenholtz, Supervisor; Morgan Leake, Justice of the Peace; James Gallup, Town Clerk; Elisha White, Collector; John S. Beebe, Assessor; William Williamson, Commissioner of Highways; Charles Saddlemire and Ira Stevens, Overseers of the Poor; George Hane, William Sand and David H. Spencer, Inspectors of Election, District No. 1; Robert Schoonmaker, George Terpening and John Saddlemire, 4th, Inspectors of Election, District No. 2; Charles Gage, Ira Bunza, Moses Gallup and Jacob F. Clickman, Constables.

1858.—Samuel Gallup, Supervisor; David C. Seabury, Justice of the Peace ; Francis Wood, Town Clerk ; Peter Allen, Collector; Jacob W. Bronk, Commissioner of Highways; Jacob J. Truax, Assessor; James Finch and Ira Stephens, Overseers of the Poor; Elon Gallup, Adam Reamer and George Hane, Inspectors of Election, District No. 1; John Saddlemire, Alexander Howard and John S. Wilber, Inspectors of Election, District No. 2 ; Charles Gage, William Havens, Moses Gallup and Archibald Hanney, Constables.

1859.—Samuel Gallup, Supervisor; Henry Warrick, Justice of the Peace; James A. Houck, Town Clerk ; Jacob Kneiskem, Assessor; A very Crary, Collector; John Pitcher, Overseer of the Poor; John Armstrong, Jr., and Dcnison Crary, Inspectors of Election, District No. I ; Joseph A. Haswell and Henry W. Williams, Inspectors of Election, District No. 2; Andrew Batcher, William Kneiskem, Edward A. Chace and John Quay, Constables.

1860.—Samuel Warner, Supervisor; Ephraim N. Bogardus, Justice of the Peace; James A. Houck, Town Clerk; Ira Van Auken, Commissioner of Highways; Andrew Batcher and Lewis Quay, Assessors; Amos Saddlemire, Collector; John Pitcher, Overseer of the Poor; John Armstrong, Jr., Denison Crary and William H. Ketchum, Inspectors of Election, District No. I ; Ezra Lee, Joseph A. Haswell and John Ketchum, Inspectors of Election, District No. 2; Charles Gage, Ira Bunzey, John Stephens and Elisha White, Constables.

1861.—Samuel Warner, Supervisor; George Terpenning, Justice of the Peace; James A. Houck, Town Clerk ; Ira Van Auken, Commissioner of Highways; Hiram Gage, Assessor; Amos Saddlemire, Collector; John Pitcher, Overseer of the Poor; Daniel J. Crary, John Armstrong and Paul Schoonmaker, Inspectors of Election, District No. 1 ; Joseph A. Haswell, Jeremiah Roach and Benjamin Finch, Inspectors of Election, District No. 2; Charles Gage, Ira Bunzey, Thomas P. Whipple and Jeremiah Roach, Constables.

1862.—Samuel Warner, Supervisor; John Allen, Jr., Justice of the Peace; Ezra Lee, Town Clerk ; Ira Van Auken, Commissioner of Highways; John Pitcher, Overseer of the Poor; John Posson, Assessor ; George J. Williamson, Collector; Silas Pitcher, Daniel J. Crary and Andrew Gallup, Inspectors of Election, District No. 1; Jeremiah Roach, Benjamin C. Auchampaugh and Benjamin Finch, Inspectors of Election, District No. 2; Thomas P. Whipple, Benjamin C. Auchampaugh, Charles Gage and Ira Bunzey, Constables.

1863.—John Keenholtz, Supervisor; Michael F. Hilton, Justice of the Peace; Ezra Lee, Town Clerk ; Ezra Brodt, Collector; Ira Van Auken, Commissioner of Highways; John Pitcher, Overseer of the Poor; Peter Schoonmaker and Lyman P. Witter, Assessors; Daniel J. Crary and William H. Van Benscoten, Inspectors of Election, District No. 1; David Spencer and Edward Van Auken, Inspectors of Election, District No. 2; Charles Gage, Peter Z. Allen, Benjamin C. Auchampaugh and Andrew Batcher, Constables.

1864.—Ira Van Auken, Supervisor; E. N. Bogardus, Samuel Warner and Henry Warrich, Justices of the Peace; Edward M. Van Auken, Town Clerk; Denison Crary, Commissioner of Highways; Samuel B. Davenport, Assessor; Joseph W. Crary, Collector; John Pitcher, Overseer of the Poor; William H. Van Benscoten, Daniel J. Crary and Ira Fairlee, Inspectors of Election, District No. 1 ; Miner E. Posson, Henry H. Wilbur and B. Finch, Inspectors of Election, District No. 2 ; Charles Gage, Peter 7.. Allen, Andrew Batcher and Oliver B. Fairlee, Constables.

1865.—Ira Van Auken, Supervisor; John R. Williams and Samuel Warner, Justices of the Peace;

Edward M. Van Auken, Town Clerk ; Coleman Armstrong, Collector ; Denison Crary, Commissioner of Highways; Peter Schoonmaker, Assessor; Peter Z. Allen, Overseer of the Poor; Peter S. Snyder, Hiram Bunzey and Peter Hungerford, Inspectors of Election, District No. 1; Henry A. Wilbur, Miner E. Posson and John Williamson, Inspectors of Election, District No. 2; Charles Gage, Ira Bunzey, David Houghton and Oliver B. Fairlee, Constables.

1866.—Peter Schoonmaker, Supervisor; Jacob Van Benscoten, Town Clerk; Morgan Leik and George A. Batcher, Justices of the Peace; Lyman Witter, Assessor; Denison Crary, Commissioner of Highways; John Pitcher and Peter Z. Allen. Overseers of the Poor; Levi Pier, Collector; Hiram Bunzey and Peter S. Snyder, Inspectors of Election, District No. 1; Robert Haswell and Oliver Fairlee, Inspectors of Election, District No. 2; Ira Bunzey, Charles Gage, Miner Quay and Theodore Batcher, Constables.

1867.—Peter Schoonmaker, Supervisor; Amos Saddlemire, Town Clerk; John R. W1lliams, Justice of the Peace ; Denison Crary, Commissioner of Highways ; David Warrick, Collector; Samuel Davenport and Christopher H. Warner, Assessors ; Peter Z. Allen and John Pitcher, Overseers of the Poor; Hiram Bunzey, Peter S. Snyder and Elam Williams, Inspectors of Election, District No. 1; Charles Seabury, David W. Sturges and Alexander Ludrum, Inspectors of Election, District No. 2; Charles Gage, Oliver B. Fairlee, Theodore Batcher and John M. Quay, Constables.

Peter Schoonmaker was re-elected Supervisor each successive term until 1873.

1873.—Hiram Gage, Supervisor; David H. Crowe, Justice of the Peace; Edwin M. Cheesbro, Town Clerk; Jacob A. Warren, Collector; James Armstrong, Assessor; Ira Van Auken, Commissioner of Highways; John Armstrong and Sylvester Allan, Overseers of the Poor; E. G. A. Crounse, Henry C. Williams and David Stiner, Inspectors of Election, District No. 1; Ezra Lee, George J. Williamson and John Van Natta, Inspectors of Election, District No. 2 ; John J. Hungerford, Allen Marselis, James I. Naskolds, George Pitcher and Ezra Stephens, Constables.

1874.—Hiram Gage, Supervisor; C. Wesley Schoonmaker, Justice of the Peace; Edwin M. Cheesbro, Town Clerk; William Ostrander, Collector; Samuel B. Davenport, Assessor; Ira Van Auken, Commissioner of Highways; William Baxter and John Armstrong, Overseers of the Poor;

E. G. A. Crounse, H. C. Williams and David M. Stiner, Inspectors of Election, District No. 1; Hiram Van Benscoten, Theodore Ostrander and Benjamin C. Auchampaugh, Inspectors of Election, District No. 2; James I. Nasholds, Charles Gage, George Pitcher and Jacob J. Truax, Constables.

1875.—James M. Cheesbro, Supervisor; Foster

F. Warrick, Justice of the Peace; Oliver B. Fairlee, Town Clerk; William J. Haverley, Collector; John Keenholtz, Assessor; Ira Van Auken, Commissioner; John Armstrong and Sylvester Allen, Overseers of the Poor; Denison Crary, William Sand and Rufus Gaige, Commissioners of Excise; Henry C. Williams, David Stiner and Austin Crary, Inspectors of Election, District No. 1; Theodore Ostrander, Ira S. Van Auken and Austin Gifford, Inspectors of Election, District No. 2; Ezra Stevens, John Pitcher, Abraham Ostrander and William J. Pier, Constables; James H. Nasholds, Game Constable.

1876.—James M. Cheesbro, Supervisor; Ezra Champion, Justice of the Peace; Oliver B. Fairlee, Town Clerk; Rufus Swan, Collector; Amos Saddlemire, Assessor; Ira Van Auken, Commissioner of Highways; E. Atmstrong and Jacob H. Saddlemire, Overseers of the Poor; Sanford Quay, William G. McDonald and Nelson Quay, Inspectors of Election, District No. 1; Ira S. Van Auken, Henry A. Wilbur and John Van Natta, Inspectors of Elect1on, District No. 2; Frank Adams, Ezra Stevens, Charles H. Ball, Abram Ostrander and Charles Gage, Constables.

1877.—James M. Cheesbro, Supervisor; Charles W. Schoonmaker, Elam Williams and C. B. Wood, Justices of the Peace; Ambrose L. Saddlemire, Town Clerk; Henry Way, Collector; Almond Marselis, Assessor; Ralph Woolford, Commissioner of Highways; Samuel H. Saddlemire and William Ostrander, Overseers of the Poor; Hiram Van Benscoten and Denison Crary, Excise Commissioners; Sanford Quay, Isaac Reamer and William J. McDonald, Inspectors of Election, District No. 1; George J. Williamson, Ira S. Van Auken and Austin Gifford, Inspectors of Election, District No. 2; Charies H. Ball, Frank Adams, Ezra Stephens, John Osterhant, William J. Smith and Louis Winne, Constables.

1878.—William J. Haverley, Supervisor; Norman O. Bell, Justice of the Peace; Ambrose L. Saddlemire, Town Clerk; Jacob A. Werner, Assessor; Wilbur O. Van Auken, Collector; Eliakim Armstrong and John Posson, Overseers of the Poor; Ralph Wolford, Commissioner of Highways; Theodore Armstrong, Excise Commissioner; William J. McDonald, Hiram Bunzey and N. Cheesbro, Inspectors of Election, District No. 1; Perry C. Ostrander, Charles E. Sturges and Lewis C. Lendrum, Inspectors of Election, District No. z; John M. Quay, Frank Adams, John L. Schoonmaker, William J. Smith and Ezra Stevens, Constables; Louis Winne, Game Constable.

1879.—I. W. Cheesbro, Supervisor; Elam Williams, Justice of the Peace; Wilbur O. Van Auken, Town Clerk; Charles F. Seabury, Assessor; H. J. Truax, Collector; John Posson and Eliakim Armstrong, Overseers of the Poor; Ralph Wolford, Commissioner of Highways; Sanford Quay and Miner Chrisler, Inspectors of Election, District Xo. 1; Perry C. Ostrander and Robert D. Roach, I nspectors of Election, District No. 2; Ezra Stevens, John M. Quay, Frank Adams and William J. Smith, Constables.

1880.—I. W. Cheesbro, Supervisor; Ezra Champion, Justice of the Peace; Oliver B. Fairlee, Town Clerk; Almond Marcelis and Jacob H. Werner, Assessors; Theodore Batcher, Collector; Jacob J. Truax and William Baxter, Overseers of the Poor;

Ralph Wolford, Commissioner of Highways; Ellery Deitz and Clark Hunting, Inspectors of Election, District No. 1; Ira S. Van Auken and Michael Harley, Inspectors of Election, District No. 2; Gilbert Gage, Jacob Stevens, John M. Quay-, Ezra Stevens and William J. Smith, Constables.

1881.—I. W. Cheesbro, Supervisor; O. B. Fairlee, Town Clerk; Charles W. Schoonmaker and F. F. Warrick, Justices of the Peace; W. P. Witter, Assessor; Hiram Bonzey, Collector; Sylvester Allen and E. Armstrong, Overseers of the Poor; Ralph Wolford, Commissioner of Highways; William McDonald, John G. Gallup and L. Haverley, Inspectors of Election, District No. 1; Theodore Ostrander, Michael F. Halsey and C. Chapman, Inspectors of Election, District No. 2; Gilbert Gage, Frank Adams, A. Witter and Jacob E. Stevens, Constables; Elisha H. Davenport, Excise Commissioner.

1882.—William J. Haverley, Supervisor; Adam C. Hunting, Town Clerk; J. D. Wood, Justice of the Peace; Ralph Wolford, Commissioner of Highways; Sylvester Allen and E. Armstrong, Overseers of the Poor; Ira S. Van Auken, Collector; Charles F. Seabury, Assessor; William McDonald, Allen Kreiskem and L. Haverley, Inspectors of Election, District No. 1; Arthur Witter, Theodore Ostrander and John Van Natta, Inspectors of Election, District No. 2; Gilbert Gage, Frank Adams, James I. Nasholts and William J. Pier, Constables; Edward Stafford, Game Constable; Manasseh Schoonmaker, Excise Commissioner.

1883.—Charles G. Frink, Supervisor; Elam Williams, Justice of the Peace; Adam C. Hunting, Town Clerk; Newton Ketchum, Commissioner of Highways; Sylvester Allen and Theodore Ostrander, Overseers of the Poor; A. Kreiskem, Alonzo Warner and L. Haverley, Inspectors of Election, District No. 1; Amos Fairlee, William P. Witter and Miles Posson, Inspectors of Election, District No. 2; James I. Nasholts, William J. Smith, Gilbert Gage, Ezra Stephens and Frank Adams, Constables; Denison Crary, Excise Commissioner.

1884.—Charles G. Frink, Supervisor; Wilbur O. Van Auken, Town Clerk; Lyman P. Witter, Assessor; Madison Finch, Collector; William Baxter and Hebron J. Truax, Overseers of the Poor; John J. Gallup, Adam C. Hunting and Edward J. Youngs, Inspectors of Election, District No. 1; Robert Schoonmaker, Eliakim Armstrong and Miles Posson, Inspectors of Election, District No. 2; Gilbert Gage, James I. Nasholts, William J. Smith, William J. Pier and Frank Adams, Constables; Edward Stafford, Game Constable; William J. Crary, Excise Commissioner.

KNOX IN THE REBELLION.

Knox bore a highly creditable part during the late war for the Union. Her sons responded patriotically to the call to arms, and the town, in its municipal capacity, generously encouraged enlistments. The following extract from the records will be found of great interest in this connection:

SPECIAL TOWN MEETING.

We, the undersigned, the Justices of the Peace and Town Clerk of the Town of Knox, in the County of Albany, do certify that we convened as a board of town officers, on the 26th day of July, 1862, at a special town meeting held at the Town House of said town, agreeable to a notice posted according to law in such cases made and provided, and that such notice stated the intents and purposes for which said town meeting was called. The following resolution, having received the unanimous vote of the electors there present, was declared duly adopted:

That we, the inhabitants and electors, tax payers of the Town of Knox, in the County of Albany, this day convened, do hereby authorize the Supervisor of the aforesaid Town of Knox, Samuel Warner, to borrow the sum of eighteen hundred (1,800) dollars, on the credit of the Town of Knox, and that the said sum so borrowed be levied on the taxpaying inhabitants of the said Town of Knox at the next annual meeting of the Board of Supervisors of the County of Albany, and that the same be levied and collected together with the State, county and town taxes, and that the aforesaid sum so borrowed shall be paid as bounty money, to be apportioned in sums of one hundred dollars each to the eighteen persons, the due apportionment for the Town of Knox, who shall enlist as a soldier in the service of his country during the present war. Given under our hands at Knox this 26th day of July, 1862.

Ephraim N. Bogardvs,

George Terpenning,

Henry Warrick,

Ezra Lee,

Justices of the Peace.

Recorded per me this 8th day of September, 1862. Ezra Lee,

Tmvn Clerk.

Doubtless further extracts from the records of Knox during this important period of its history would be found both interesting and valuable; but, unfortunately, several leaves are missing, following those from which quotation has been made and covering the remaining years of the war, and there is no further recorded evidence of the official acts of the town authorities during our memorable internecine struggle. But the sons of Knox were patriotic and nobly did their part, on the field of strife as well as elsewhere, toward the preservation of the Union. Following will be found a roster of those who enlisted in the United States Army from the Town of Knox, from 1861 to 1865, inclusive. It is copied from official sources, and is as complete and exact as it can be made. It contains honorable mention of many representatives of the oldest and and most influential families of the

Henry Allen, private. Seventh Artillery, Company K; enlisted August 1, 1862; mustered August 14, 1862; after serving nearly two years, was mortally wounded, and his remains lie buried near Petersburg, Va.

Michael Henry Barckley, first lieutenant, Seventh Artillery, Company K; enlisted July 2, 1862; mustered August 14, 1862; after serving nearly two years, was wounded in the right leg so that amputation was necessary; he died from the operation, and his remains are buried in Knox Cemetery.

Charles Baxter, sergeant, Seventh Artillery, Company K; enlisted July 26, 1862; mustered August 14, 1862; after serving nearly two years, was taken prisoner at Ream's Station, Virginia, sent to Petersburg, thence to Libby Prison, thence to Belle Isle Prison, thence to the prison at Salisbury, North Carolina; later was in service again.

Kleber Burlingame, corporal, Sixty-first Regiment, Company I; enlisted September 10, 1862; mustered September 9, 1862.

Joseph Merchant Bundy, private, Seventh Artillery, Company K; enlisted August 12, 1862; mustered August 14, 1862; after serving nearly three years, it is thought he died in one of the Confederate prisons.

Albert Bell, private, Tenth Regiment, Company G; enlisted October 1, 1862; mustered October 13, 1862; served the full term of his enlistment and was honorably discharged.

Henry AugustusCrary,Sergeant, 1 77th Regiment, Company G; enlisted in September, 1862; mustered October 13, 1862; served full term and was honorably discharged.

John Henry Carroll, private, Seventh Artillery, Company A; enlisted August 1, 1862; mustered August 14, 1862; shot through the head and killed at Petersburg, Va., and buried on the field.

Miram Auchampaugh, private, Twentieth Militia, Company K ; enlisted August 25, 1864; mustered in September, 1864; discharged at close of war.

Adam Campbell, private, Seventh Artillery, Company K ; enlisted August 12, 1862; mustered August 14, 1862; taken prisoner at Ream's Station, Va.

Joseph B. Davis, corporal, Sixty-first Regiment, Company D; enlisted in September, 1862; mustered September 19, 1862; discharged by reason of disability in 1863; died and was buried near Fairfax Court House, Va.

Miner Ecker, private, Sixty-first Regiment, Company I; enlisted in August, 1862; mustered September 19, 1862; discharged by reason of disability and died in Knox, and is buried in Berne.

Jerome W. Ecker, private, 177th Regiment, Company G; enlisted in October, 1862; mustered in November, 1862; honorably discharged at expiration of his term of service.

John Jay Gallup, private, 177th Regiment, Company A; enlisted, and mustered October 13, 1862; served nearly eleven months; was at the siege of Port Hudson; was honorably discharged. .

Henry James Gallup, fife major, 177th Regiment, Company A; enlisted October 13, 1862; mustered same date; was honorably discharged at expiration of term of service.

Adam Matthias Hanes, private, Ninety-first Regiment, Company D; enlisted in August, 1861; mustered in November, 1861; after being in service nearly two years, he was mortally wounded at Port Hudson and died fourteen days afterward, and was buried at New Orleans.

Amos Gideon Hanes, private, Ninety-first Regiment, Company D; enlisted in August, 1861; mustered in November, 1861; served nearly three years; died of chronic diarrhoea, and was buried in Knox Cemetery.

Arthur Haswell, private, 177th Regiment, Company B; enlisted October 22, 1862; mustered November 18, 1862; after serving six months, died at Bonnet Carre, La.; buried in Rural Cemetery, Albany.

Elias Hanes, private, seventh Artillery, Company K; enlisted July 26,1862; mustered August 14,1862; was in service over two years, and died of wounds in the leg received at Cold Harbor; buried in Knox Cemetery.

Charles H. Hochstrasser, private, Tenth Regiment, Company G; enlisted October 1, 1862, and mustered same date; served nearly one year and was honorably discharged.

Alonzo Luddon, Jr., corporal, 187th Regiment, Company I; enlisted October 1, 1862; mustered November, 1862; was one of the " 1, ooo stormers" at Port Hudson and the first of his company to advance; died of disease contracted in service and is buried at Gallupville, Schoharie County.

Andrew W. Kellogg, private, Eleventh Battery; enlisted November 11, 1861; mustered in December, 1861. Died of small-pox at the Marine Hospital, Baltimore, Md., June 1, 1862; buried in Baltimore.

Newton Ketcham, private, Ninth Artillery, Company A; enlisted September 6, 1864; mustered September 12, 1864; was in service ten

months, participating in the fight at Cedar Creek and the battle of Petersburg, Va.

Harrison Kniskem, sergeant, Sixty-first Regiment, Company I ; enlisted August 30, 1862 ; mustered September 17, 1862 ; promoted sergeant September 19, 1862 ; served six months and was discharged on account of disability.

John Miner .Quay, corporal, Seventh Artillery, company K; enlisted July 28, 1862 ; mustered August 18, 1862 ; promoted from private at battle of Spottsylvania Court House, Va.

Paul Quay, sergeant, Seventh Artillery, Company K ; enlisted July 20, 1862 ; mustered August 18, 1862 ; promoted from corporal ; taken prisoner before Petersburg, June 16, 1864, and sent to Belle Isle ; is supposed to have died of starvation at Andersonville.

Andrew Grass, private, Seventh Artillery; enlisted and mustered August 25, 1864 ; served till discharged.

George Riter, private, Sixty-first Regiment, Company I; enlisted August 30, 1862; mustered September 19, 1862 ; killed May 10, 1864, at Po River, Va.

Lewis Washington Quay, private, Seventh Artillery, Company K; enlisted August 4, 1862; mustered August 14, 1862 ; served nearly a year and died at Washington, D. C., of typhus fever.

Isaac Jonathan Roach, sergeant, Forty-fourth Regiment, Company F; enlisted and mustered in 1861; served nearly three months, and died December 29, 1861, at Camp Butterfield, Va., of typhus fever; is buried in Knox.

Charles Edmond Sturges, corporal, Seventh Artillery, Company K; enlisted July 28, 1862; mustered August 14, 1862 ; served three years and was honorably discharged.

Denison Saddlemire, private, Eleventh Battery ; enlisted September 5, and was mustered September 8X 1864 ; honorably discharged at expiration of term of service.

John Hurst, private, Seventh Artillery, Company K ; enlisted August 9, and mustered August 14, 1862 ; died of typhus fever, at Baltimore, Md., March 16, 1864.

Charles Secor, private, Ninth Artillery, Company A ; enlisted September 6, and mustered September 12, 1864 ; was in the fight at Cedar Creek, and was honorably discharged at the end of his term of service.

Simon John Secor, private, Ninth Artillery, Company A; enlisted September 6, and mustered September 12, 1864; after serving a little more than a month, he was wounded in the right leg at Cedar Creek, rendering amputation necessary, and was discharged for disability.

Peter Secor, private, Sixty-first Regiment, Company I; enlisted in August, 1862 ; mustered September 19, 1862.

Andrew Secor, private.

Andrew Secor, Jr., private, Sixty-first Regiment, Company I; enlisted in August, 1862 ; mustered September 19, 1862.

Gabriel Henry Secor, corporal, Sixty-first Regiment, Company I; enlisted in August, 1862; mustered September 19, 1862; wounded at the battle of Gettysburg, Pa., and transferred to the invalid corps.

John Stalker, sergeant, Sixty-first Regiment, Company I; enlisted August 21, 1862; mustered September 19, 1862 ; died of disease in hospital at Washington, D. C.

Henry W. Stalker, private, Sixty-first Regiment, Company J; enlisted in August, and mustered September 19, 1862 ; died at Washington, D. C., May 5, 1863, from wounds, and was buried at Washington.

Chauncey Groat Townsend, private. Sixty-first Regiment, Company I ; enlisted in August, and mustered September 19, 1862.

David Stafford, private, 117th Regiment, Company H ; enlisted in September, and mustered October 13, 1862; served full term of enlistment.

Gabriel Secor, corporal, Ninety-first Regiment, Company D ; enlisted for three years; was in battle at Fort McHenry, and died at Federal Hill; buried in Berne.

Orville Merrihew, private, 113th Regiment, Company D ; enlisted August 12, 1862; mustered in September, 1862 ; died in Millen Prison of starvation and derangement.

Jesse D. Wood, private, Ninety-first Regiment, Company D ; enlisted and mustered October 26, 1862; died of sickness at Port Hudson, while in service ; buried in Berne.

John Michael Stines, private, Eleventh Battery ; enlisted October 18, 1861 ; mustered January 5, 1862 ; enlisted a second time.

George Albert Simons, private, Eleventh Regiment, Company G; enlisted October 1, 1862; mustered October 19, 1862 ; promoted to sergeant and afterward to a clerkship in the Quartermaster's department .

Henry Crary Williams, enlisted August 30, 1862, and mustered September 19, 1862, as first

sergeant, Company H, Sixty-first Regiment; promoted to second lieutenant February 20, 1863, and to captain, January 12, 1864.

Jacob Van Benscoten, corporal, Seventh Artillery; enlisted August 5, and mustered August 14, 1862; after serving nearly two years, was wounded in the neck; was discharged June 16, 1865.

Addison Reinhart, private, 113th Regiment, Company K; enlisted August 1, and mustered August 18, 1863 ; was confined at Andersonville ten months, and at the expiration of his term of enlistment was honorably discharged.

Thomas Pinckney Whipple, private, 177th Regiment, Company G; enlisted October 27, 1863; mustered November 27, 1863 ; served nine months ; honorably discharged.

William Havens, private, Seventh Artillery, Company K; enlisted in July, 1862; mustered August 24, 1862 ; died from wounds and was buried at Petersburg, Va.

William Darius Fairlee, Tenth Regiment.

James D. Covert, private, 156th Regiment.

Myron L. Ham, Tenth Regiment.

Spencer Lelie, Tenth Regiment .

John Quincy Adams Crounse, Eleventh or Havelock Battery; died in service.

Francis Courtney, Tenth Regiment .

Andrew Jackson Damon, private, Seventh Artillery, Company K.

Charles Price, 113th Regiment.

Uriah Hallenbeck, Tenth Regiment, Company G; died in service ; buried at Cairo.

Samuel W. Kelly, Tenth Regiment .

George Robert O'Donald, Fourth Regiment.

George Todd, Tenth Regiment.

Levi Duel, 113th Regiment .

Madison Settle, Tenth Regiment, Company G; died in service ; buried at Fort Pillow.

Wm. Hetnon, private.

John Stafford.

Daniel F. Foley, Tenth Regiment.

Frank Shufelt, private, Eleventh Regiment; enlisted in 1862.

Edward Shufelt, private, Seventh Artillery.

Henry Crounse, Ninety-first Regiment.

Samuel H. Reely, Tenth Regiment.

Peter H. Stevens, private, 1 13th Regiment, Company G; enlisted in July, 1862; mustered August 14, 1862.

Daniel Henry Stiner, private, Tenth Regiment, Company G; enlisted October 1, 1862 ; mustered October 13, 1862.

George W. Stiner, private, Tenth Regiment.


EDUCATION.

The earliest schools in Knox were of the most primitive description. It is said that previous to the beginning of the present century two or more were taught in little log school-houses by transient pedagogues. One of these pioneer schoolhouses is reported to have stood where Knoxville now is, and another in the vicinity of the locality now known as Township. The number of these houses increased as the growing population demanded during the early portion of the century, and in time they one by one gave place to small frame buildings, some of which have been replaced by new and more comfortable and convenient ones within the last few years. Under the operation of the public school system of the State of New York, the schools of Knox have been greatly improved, and the standard of instruction has been considerbly raised.

The following statistics will show at a glance the status of the schools in each of the thirteen districts of the town for the last school year:

District No. 1.—Number teachers employed, I; number children of the school age, 52; number of weeks school was kept, 35; number of children who attended school during the year, 42; average daily attendance, 15.952; 1 frame school-house; value of school-house and site, $300.

District No. 2.—Number teachers employed, 1; number children of the school age, 59; number of weeks school was kept, 32; number of children who attended school during the year, 41; average daily attendance, 22; 1 frame school-house; value of school-house and site, $100.

Distr1ct No. 3.—Number teachers employed, 1; number children of the school age, 42; number weeks school was kept, 34; number children who attended school during the year, 31; average daily attendance, 13.3; 1 frame school-house; value of school-house and site, $500 ; number of volumes in library 50; value of library, $10.

District No. 4.—Number teachers employed, 1; number children of the school age, 30; number weeks school was kept, 28; number children who attended school during the year, 20; average daily attendance, 4.588; 1 frame school-house; value of school-house and site, $250; number volumes in library, 150; value of library, $50.

District No. 5.—Number teachers employed, 1; number children of the school age, 31; number weeks school was kept, 33; number children who attended school during the year, 27; average daily attendance, 8.5; 1 frame school-house; value of school-house and site, $500; number volumes in library, 25; value of library, $25.

D1strict No. 6.—Number teachers employed, 1; number children of the school age, 67; number of weeks school was kept, 34; number children who attended school during the year, 54; average daily

attendance, 25.7; 1 frame school-house; value of school-house and site, $20x3; number volumes in library, 100; value of library, $20.

District No. 7.—Number teachers employed, 1; number children of the school age, 23; number weeks school was kept, 31; number children who attended school during the year, 21; average daily attendance, 13; 1 frame school-house; value of school-house and site, $300; number volumes in library, 30; value of library, $5.

District No. 8.—Number teachers employed, 1; number children of the school age, 38; number children who attended school during the year, 37; average daily attendance, 16.934; 1 frame schoolhouse; value of school-house and site, $300; number volumes in library, 25; value of library, $5; number weeks school was kept, 36.

District No. 9 is a joint district, most of which lies within the town of Wright, Schoharie County, only 2 children of the school age living in the portion lying in Knox and the school-house being located in Wright.

District No. 10.—Number teachers employed, 1; number children of the school age, 41; number weeks school was kept, 30; number children who attended school during the year, 41; average daily attendance, 14; 1 frame school-house; value of school-house and site, $200; number books in library, 60; value of library, $20.

District No. 11.—Number teachers employed, 1; number children of the school age, 47; number of weeks school was kept, 30; number children who attended school during the year, 37; average daily attendance, 13.492; 1 frame school-house; value of school-house and site, $500; number volumes in library, 75; value of library, $40.

District No. 12.—Number teachers employed, 1; number children of the school age, 22; number of weeks school was kept, 28; number of children who attended school during the year, 10; average daily attendance, 4; 1 frame school-house; value of school-house and site, $400; number volumes in library, 78.

District No. 13.—Number teachers employed, 1; number children of the school age, 20; number weeks school was kept, 28; number of children who attended school during the year, 15; average daily attendance, 7.128; 1 frame school-house; value of school-house and site, $400; number volumes in library, 100.

An institution which has been in some sense a rival of the public schools of Knox, and which the partisans of the public school system contend was greatly instrumental in retarding its development in the town, is the Knoxville Academy. This institution, which during the past two years has been inoperative, and which it is not thought is likely to be revived, once stood high among similar educational establishments, and caused Knox to be regarded as the educational center of a considerable area of surrounding country. Many men of Albany County, who have since become distinguished in various walks of life were students there thirty and forty years ago, and the institution was under the care of a succession of able instructors, named as follows :

Rev. Mr. Lockwood, Mr. Scribner, Henry Gallup, M. P. Cavert, Mr. Baker, Mr. Lyon, Mr. Warner, Charles McGregor, Henry McGregor, John T. Lansing, Samuel Patton, Rev. Mr. Jones, M. M. Goodenough, J. Q. A. Crounse, George P. Quay, Eugene Crounse, D. G. Many, John Bogardus, Alfred Batey and David E. Coeler.

This institution was organized under the general law of the State of New York for the establishment of academies, about 1829 or 1830, by Messrs. Gurdon, Gardiner and John Gallup, Dr. Elisha Williams, Dr. Brownell, Jesse Tyler and others. For many years it enjoyed a large patronage from the surrounding portions of Albany and Schoharie counties, and many students came from abroad ; but its patronage has gradually declined since the establishment of State Normal Schools and Graded Public Schools, and its years of usefulness seem to have passed. Its retrogression does not mark it as being in any manner peculiarly unfortunate, for its fate has been shared by nearly every other academy in the State, some of which have not been opened for one or two decades j while its active existence did not terminate until within the past two years. During the temporary unfitness of the neighboring public school building, the old academy building has lately been occupied by the public school of the village of Knoxville. The board of trustees of the Knoxville Academy, in 1884, was constituted as follows : Elam Williams, president; S. Sand, John G. Crary, J. W. Chesebro, Hon. Peter Schoonmaker, E. G. A. Crounse, A. C. Hunting, J. C. Ogden and Denison Crary.


KNOX'S PROFESSIONAL MEN

It is believed that Dr. Erastus Williams was the first resident physician in Knox. He practiced his profession there during the early part of the present century. Dr. Moses Brownell was his contemporary and successor. Drs. John Van Allen, Zeh, Sigsby, Johnson and Johnson have been resident physicians since their time. Azor Taber, who was born in 1799 and died in 1858, was the only lawyer who ever practiced his profession in the town.


CHURCHES

The New England settlers within the borders of Knox brought with them the religious tenets of their forefathers in Connecticut, and it was not long

before the advisability of forming a Presbyterian congregation was agitated. It is thought to have been some years before a formal organization was effected, under the transient ministration of some clergyman who chanced to visit the locality. Irregular worship was established and occasional preaching was had until 1825, when the first pastor was settled. It is said that the church was formally organized by the Rev. Dr. Nott, of Union College.

About September 1, 1825, the Presbyterian congregation of Knox presented a call to Rev. J. Judson Buck to become their pastor and labor as such one-half of the time. This call was accepted, and on the 19th day of October following he was installed over the congregations of Knox and Hamilton Union. The engagement was to preach alternately to each congregation. At that time fifty-five persons belonged to the congregation. They were named as follows :

Henry Denison, P. Witter, Isaac Barber, Erastus Williams, Daniel Chesebro, John Gallup, Wright Skinner, Dow Van Derker, Henry Dane, Cyrus Chapman, Henry Williams, Daniel Gallup, Sally Todd, Lucy Gallup, Lucy Witter, Bridget Chesebro, Anna Chesebro, Betsy Van Derker, Nancy Van Derker, Rebecca Van Derker, Nancy Chesebro, Lewis Denison, Ann Allen, Ann Witter, Damas Corwith Witter, Polly Van Alstyne, Hannah Hilton, Nancy Gallup, Polly Crary, Sarah Williams, Abigail Rodgers, Mary Brownell, Elizabeth Brown, Mary White, Mrs. Russel, Betsy Wilson, Rachel Warrick, Hannah Settle, Ann Clow, Catherine Butterfield, Margaret Groat, Anna Young, Sarah Todd, Nancy Brown, Sally Parker, Susan B. Todd, Barbara Hart, Nancy Crary, Caroline Wilson, Polly Bundy, Asenath Tails, Lavina Chapman, Amy Bundy and Nancy Starkweather.

Rev. Mr. Buck had at this time been laboring with the people irregularly since 1822, and of these named above all except eleven united with the church through his influence. Those who were in connection at the time he came were the following named : Henry Denison, P. Witter, [John Gallup]], Daniel Chesebro, Wright Skinner, Hannah Gallup, Sally Todd, Lucy Gallup, Lucy Witter, Bridget Chesebro and Anna Chesebro. The elders of the congregation were Erastus Williams, Isaac Barber, P. Witter and Henry Denison.

The following entry appears in the church records under date of October 19, 1828 :

" This day ends three years of my pastoral labor at Knox. Having resigned my charge at Hamilton Union, for the last year I have labored constantly at Knox. J. Judson Buck."

April 26, 1829, the pastor wrote as follows:

"This day closes my pastoral labors at Knox. Having obtained leave of Presbytery-, I have resigned my pastoral charge.

"The church of Knox, which I greatly love, I commend to God and to the riches of His grace. Leaving it it the hands of "that great Shepherd of the sheep," I go away, praying the blessing of God may rest upon it, and that God may soon give it a pastor after His own heart . J. Judson Buck."

Rev. Mr. Buck's connection with the church does not appear to have ceased, however, until some time in 1830, as he is recorded as having acted as moderator at meetings of the session until then. After an interregnum of fully a year, he was again moderator when the session met, August 26, 1831. It is supposed that he resided in the vicinity and took a friendly and helpful interest in the church, but did not act as its pastor after 1829. The records do not show that any pastor was installed subsequently, but Rev. Mr. Waters and Rev. Mr. Robertson, Rev. David Lyon, Rev. Mr. Snyder, Rev. Mr. Lockwood and other clergymen from neighboring churches, from time to time, acted as moderators at the meetings of the sessions, and by some it is thought that Rev. Mr. Waters and Rev. Mr. Rockwood were duly installed pastors.

The church seems to have languished. Financial and numerical weakness seems to have threatened its disintegration. The Presbyterians of Knox were few in number. They had no pastor. Their church was isolated from others of its kind. A strong sentiment had sprung up in the town in favor of the Dutch Reformed Church. For some time the advisability of reorganizing their church according to the rules of the Dutch Reformed Church was discussed by the Presbyterians. It is not to be supposed that this step could be taken without much opposition and no little acrimony. It involved the withdrawal of some members and the tardy and most unwilling acquiescence of others. The change was effected, however, and the old Presbyterian Church of Knox became the foundation upon which was erected the Reformed Church of Knox.

The church and congregation were received into the classis of Albany, at its semi-annual session held at Westerlo, September to, 1842, and constituted "The First Reformed Dutch Church of Knox." The following members of the old Presbyterian Church were dismissed to form the new organization: Daniel Chesebro and wife, Joseph Gallup and wife, Henry Williams and wife, Lois Freeman, Ann Allen, Samuel Russell and wife, Mrs. Hannah Hilton, Mrs. Park Witter, Ann

Young, Sally Packer, Daniel Gallup, Margaret Groat, Amelia Clute, Cornelia Bogardus, Sarah M. Williams, Gurden Gallup and wife, Eve Haverley, Magdalen Luce, John J. Tyler, Charles Clute, Beebe D. Crary, Cornelia L. Werner, Henrietta M. Williams, Sarah Herrick, Hannah Gallup and Hannah Crary.

At a meeting of the male members of the church held on Saturday, September 31, 1842, the following persons were chosen members of the consistory: Daniel Chesebro, Joseph Gallup, Gurden Gallup, Henry Williams, Jr., John Van Allen, Michael P. Cavart, Charles Clute, John Posson. Henry Williams was chosen treasurer and John Van Allen clerk. At that time the congregation consisted of forty-three members, representing twenty-five families.

The reorganization was effected under the ministration of Rev. Joseph Kneiskem, who was pastor of the new church until succeeded by Rev. John Vandervolgen. The succeeding pastors have been Rev. Mr. Hammond, Rev. Mr. Bogardus, Rev. James Compton, Rev. Mr. Vedder, Rev. William H. Ballagh and Rev. George M. D. Slocum, who resigned in 1882, since when the church has had no settled pastor, but has been "supplied" from Gallupville, Schoharie County.

The membership of this organization in 1884 was forty-five. The consistory and board of trustees were composed as follows: Henry Barckley, Charles Clute, elders, and William Chesebro and John Bogardus, deacons. The original house of worship was a plain wooden building, of the uninviting kind, which have been denominated "God's barns." It stood in Knoxville, a little below the site of the present structure, and on the same side of the street. The edifice now in use is a frame building, which was built about thirty years ago.

EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN CHURCH.

Nearly all the books and papers of Zion's Evangelical Lutheran Church of Knox prior to 1828 are lost, so that very little of its early history is known, except what is given in Munsell's Annals and the old church books of Schoharie and Guilderland. About 1745 the members of the Reformed and Lutheran churches in this vicinity took up, under the church patent law, a tract of land for a Reformed and Lutheran church, lot and farm containing about forty-two acres. Soon after Rev. Nicholas Sommer, while pastor at Schoharie, visited this neighborhood and organized a Lutheran church. The first church and schoolhouse, a building about twenty feet square, was erected about 1750. In August, 1810, another building lot was purchased, and in the following fall the old church was removed to the new lot and remodeled. In the spring of 1828 this old church was torn down and a new church, twenty by thirty feet, was framed, raised and partly inclosed; but before the windows were put in, or the doors hung, the Reformed and Lutheran officers had some misunderstanding, and their disagreement continued so long that the officers resigned and the society was broken up, nothing remaining but the unfinished church and the deed, all other papers having been lost or destroyed.

Nothing was done toward finishing the church or organizing the congregation until December 19, 1829, when a number of the former members, together with some others who helped support the gospel, met and re-incorporated and chartered "'/.ron's Lutheran and Reformed Church of the • Helderberg," and as soon as weather would permit the church was completed. In 1839, owing to some difficulties, the Reformed members withdrew and built a church at Secors. October 13, 1839, Rev. Adam Crounse fully reorganized Zion's Lutheran Church at Knox with fifty-one members, twenty-one of whom were living in 1881. In 1850 the presentchurch was erected, at a cost of $1,200. It was dedicated, March 23, 1851, Rev. Dr.Lintner, of Schoharie, preaching the sermon, and Rev. Adam Crounse, the pastor, conducting the other exercises. The parsonage was built in 1868 and 1869.

The first record of any pastorate that can be found states that in 1745 Rev. Peter Nicholas Sommer, then located at Schoharie, at stated times preached and administered the sacraments. From 1790 to 1800 Rev. Henry Moeller preached occasionally. From 1800 to 1828 Revs. Miller and Merkle occupied the pulpit. About 1830 Rev. Adam Crounse became pastor, in connection with Berne and Guilderland. He resigned in 1884. In 1845 and 1846 Rev. A. L. Bridgman became pastor of Guilderland and Knox, Berne having secured a pastor of its own. He resigned in 1848, and Rev. Adam Crounse was again pastor from 1849 to 1862. The church was without a pastor till November, 1864, the pulpit being supplied monthly by the members of the third conference, when Rev. A. N. Daniels became pastor, serving till June, 1872. Rev. N. Klock was pastor from July, 1872, to April, 1875. He was succeeded by Rev. A. Martenis, who resigned in 1877, returning fora few months in 1878. In November, 1878, Rev. Luther P. Ludden took charge and remained

till the fall of 1883. Since that time the church has been supplied, Rev. Silas Young, of Gallupvillc, Schoharie County, occupying its pulpit and attending to the duties connected with the pastorate. When not occupied by a resident pastor, the glebe has been leased for farming purposes, and the rental applied for the benefit of the church. The present membership is about 120.

In 1884 the official management of this church was in the control of the following persons:

Trustees—Theodore Batcher, Amos G. Warner and Jacob A. Warner. Elders—John Keenholts, Seneca Frink, Mathias Zeh and Hiram Clickman. Deacons—Jesse Saddlemire, Eli Secor, Silas Clickman and L. Park Witter. Clerk—George Hanes.

The membership was about one hundred.

The early records of the Methodist Episcopal Church of Knox appear to be few and imperfect. Tradition says Rev. William Brown, a local preacher, was the first Methodist preacher in the town. From inscriptions on tombstones in the little cemetery on the farm owned by Nicholas Chesebro, it appears that Rev. William Brown was born October 24, 1758, and died April 25, 1834, aged 75 years, 6 months and I day. His wife, Mary (Chesebro) Brown, died January 18, 1835, aged 73 years. His daughter, Priscilla, died March 25, 1832, aged 30 years. When a young man, Rev. Mr. Brown built a house, which still stands on the Chesebro farm, and is said to be more than one hundred years old.

In its early days, this church was connected with the Methodist churches of Berne, Reedsville, Middleburgh and Schoharie, to form the Berne circuit. It is believed that Joseph Hunting, V. Dominic, Levi Van Auken and Christopher Chesebro were the first members of the Methodist church in this town.

The first church edifice stood about a mile east of the one now standing at " Knox street," and was taken down when the latter was built, in 1851, under the pastorate of Rev. John Chase. Another was built, about the same time, in that part of the town called " Township," and still another had been built in 1841, in the north part of the town. These three are now in use.

The succession of pastors has been as follows:

Revs. John Gage, 1846 and 1847; John Chase, 1851 and 1853; C. M. Anderson, 1853; Elisha Watson, 1854 and 1855; Aaron Hall, 1856 and 1857; A. Campbell, 1858 and 1859; R. Patterson, 1860 and 1861; C. E. Taylor, 1862 and 1863; M. P. Bell, 1864-1866; H. Harris, 1867 and 1868; William Earl, 1869 and 1870; W. C. Butcher, 1871; J. B. Wood, 1872 and 1873; S. Palmer,

1874 and 1875; J. C. Walker, 1876; J. J. Austin, 1877 and 1878; A. Eaton, 1879 and 1880; E. Morgan, 1881 and 1883; A. V. Marshall, 1884 and 1885.

The last annual report shows a membership of 162, and many members have since been added.

The Baptist Church in the territory now including the town of Knox was, previous to 1825, known as the Church of Berne. In 1812 Rev. N. H. Ripley was pastor, with 105 members. We learn from a copy of Minutes without date that before this the members had numbered 11o. They had no pastor for twelve years, when Rev. Samuel Hare preached for them eight years, closing his pastorate in 1832. In 1828 they had 99 members. In 1833, Rev. N. Ferguson; 1835, Rev. M. S. Earl; 1843, Rev. R. Winegar preached for them one year each. In 1845 Rev. W. Storrs was pastor, probably for two years, and the membership was 82. In 1848 and 1489 Rev. W. Hodgson was pastor, and the church gained ten members. About 1850 Rev. S. G. Tower began preaching for them, and about 1853 he, by faithful, earnest and persistent effort, succeeded in building a house of worship. He closed his labors with them about 1861. In 1864 and 1865 Rev. H. M. Jones was pastor, and Rev. Thomas Fisher began to preach for them in 1867, continuing till 1870. From September, 1872, Rev. J. S. Johnson was pastor for two year. Rev. G. Becker, then a licentiate of Flat Creek church, began preaching for them in April, 1878, and continued for some time. About this time the membership had become greatly reduced. In 1884, through the evangelical labors of Rev. L. G. Brown, of Adams, N. Y., a considerable accession of membership was secured. Charles J. Seabury is deacon, and Rev. J. Becker comes occasionally from a distance to hold, services.


MANUFACTURES

Knox cannot be regarded as a manufacturing town. It has no water-power of importance, and is too remote from transportation facilities to render the introduction of heavy steam-driven machinery profitable.

From an early date small saw-mills were in operation at various points along the small streams having their courses through the town. They did their allotted part in the work of improvement incident to the civilizing period through which Knox, in common with most other portions of our eastern country, passed in its time. Among the owners of such mills were Amos Crary, Hiram Gage, Egbert Schoonmaker and

Nathaniel Swan, who were operating previous to 1825, and Malachi Whipple, Daniel Cary and Mr. Vandecar, whose mills passed out of active existence about 1840. Swart & Saddlemire were running a mill until a few years ago, and Frederick Bouler and Bemsley Williamson are the owners of small mills, which are operated from time to time, as the depth of water in the streams will permit. The supply of timber, once plentiful, is now nearly exhausted, only occasional patches of woodland remaining.

There was once a small grist-mill on a little stream in the north part of the town. For years the farmers of Knox have been compelled to take their grain to be ground outside of the borders of the town.

Gideon Taber, who was once a shoemaker and tanner and harness manufacturer in Knox, was at the same time the progenitor of one of the leading families of the town, and one of the best known men in Albany County. He was born in New London, Conn., in 1764, of a Quaker father and mother. Being a non-combatant, he went to Canada during the Revolution, to avoid being drawn into the American army and compelled to fight against his convictions, and for a time he commanded a vessel on Lake Champlain. Coming to Knox after peace was established, he went about among the farmers, "whipping the cat," as itinerant shoemaking and repairing was denominated. Being a thrifty man, he prospered, and after a time established a small tannery, where he made leather, which he manufactured into shoes, saddles and harness, employing quite a number of men, and doing a large business for the time. He became a justice of the peace and represented his fellow citizens in the Assembly about 1818-20. His grandson, Charles Clute, now owns and lives on the old Taber homestead where his tannery' and manufacturing operations were carried on.

In 1831 Alexander Crounse, who had moved into Knox from an adjoining town, put up a tannery building, 56 feet by 28, on the main road through the town west of Knoxville, and for many years did considerable in the manufacture of harness and upper-leather. The changes in the hide and leather trade during the last few years have contributed to render this business less profitable and important than it was formerly. About five years ago Mr. Crounse transferred the establishment to his son, Eugene G. A. Crounse. An addition to the tannery building was erected in 1884, and improved machinery for the manufacture of horse feed was put in. This branch of industry Mr. Crounse carries on in connection with tanning, his father, Alexander Crounse, giving his personal attention to the supervision of the latter department.

Nathan Crary, father of Mr. John G. Crary, organized the manufacture of pill-boxes in Knox about eighty years ago. Since his time the business has been more or less extensively carried on by John G. Crary and others. The manufacturers of Brandreth's and other pills obtain their supply of small wooden boxes here, and many of the citizens of Knoxville and vicinity find employment in the industry.


BURIAL GROUNDS

In the earlier days of the history of the town, interments were made on the farms of the residents. Here and there may still be seen neatly kept family plots on gentle slopes not far distant from some of the finest farm-houses in Knox. About the time of the organization of the old Presbyterian church, the graveyard in Knoxville, which is still known as " the old Presbyterian burying ground," was opened. Occasional interments are made there still, and many of its quaint old headstones bear the names of those who were among the pioneers of the town.

The Whipple Cemetery, in the eastern part of the town, has long been much in use by the people of Knox. It occupies a commanding position upon an abrupt elevation, and contains numerous interesting and quite a number of sightly monuments. It has recently been improved and provided with a substantial inclosure and an attractive entrance. It is so known from the fact that it is located on a portion of the Whipple farm, and is maintained at the joint expense of the many families who bury their dead there.

The Knox Cemetery is a beautiful and sightly burial place, possessing many advantages. The Cemetery Company controlling it was organized in 1874, and the cemetery was dedicated by Rev. Mr. Robinson, August 18, that year. The body of Lieutenant Michael P. Barclay was the first one buried there. The officers of the company at its organization were David Van Auken, Amos Crary, Charles Clute, Henry Blackley, and one other. The present officers are as follows : Charles Gage, president; Peter Schoonmaker, secretary and treasurer ; William Van Auken, Nicholas Chesebro, W. Crary and Arthur Witter.


LOCAL INSURANCE

Knox has a local mutual fire insurance company, which has been in successful operation several years, with which Hon. Peter Schoonmaker and other prominent citizens have from time to time been officially connected. Its policies now aggregate about $400,000, and its assessable bonds amount to $16,000. Its officers in the fall of 1884 were : Ira Van Auken, president; Elias Bassler, secretary; William Sand, I. D. Haverly, James M. Chesebro, Nicholas Chesebro, Amps Saddlemire, Austin Gifford and Norman O. Bell (agent).

Text was found on Google Books, but Knox Historical Society also owns an original print copy.